How to judge “Dyed Jade”

How to judge “Dyed Jade”

If it is well made “Dyed Jade”, usually you won’t be able to judge it by your bare eyes. Professional testing equipment will be a more reliable source to provide you detailed information. However, if the dying hasn’t been perfectly done, you will still have the chance to spot the nuances through some practical techniques. The “Dyed Jade” will suffer the follow pitfalls: The color is not pure and natural, but more dull, tedious and bluish. If the dyed color is a layer of coating, you will feel that the color is only “floating” on the surface. You might find some very fine veins similar to the roots of a plants, whose color are slightly different from the rest of the piece. The dyed jade will not only lack it’s natural luster but will...

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A Comparison between Jade and other Similar Precious Stones

There are many precious stones that are similar to jade but with quite different values. Sometime sellers might cheat you by selling these similar stones instead of real jade. The following is a comparison table: Name Hardness Density (g/cm3) Color Refractive Index Other Features Jadeite 6.5-7 3.34 Green, emerald green, white, red 1.66-1.68 Green color under Chelsea colour filter; absorption band in red and purple zone Nephrite 6-6.5 2.95 White, yellow, olivine, dark green, black, etc. 1.606-1.632,often 1.621 No response under Chelsea colour filter. Chalcedony 6.5-7 2.60 Green, light green, red, blue, milk white, etc. 1.535-1.539 Green color under Chelsea colour filter; absorption band in orange...

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Jade Patterns: 9 Sons of the Dragon

Jade Patterns: 9 Sons of the Dragon

In Chinese folk legends, the Dragon has nine sons, and these patterns are often used for Jade jewelry or carvings. The sons are not dragons themselves, but nine different animals. There are different versions about which animals they are, but basically, the nine animals belong to nine different species. The legend says that the Dragon has nine sons and they all like different things. Qiu Niu likes music and sits on the top of a Qin (an orchestral instrument in the Beijing Opera); Ya Zi likes violence and is often embossed on the hilt of a knife; Chao Feng likes risks. You can find it on the corner of the roof on ancient buildings; Pu Lao cries when it is beaten. It sits on the top of a bell to help the sound ring out; Suan Ni looks like a lion. It likes to sit...

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